Definition of Prejudice in English :

Define Prejudice in English

Prejudice meaning in English

Meaning of Prejudice in English

Pronunciation of Prejudice in English

Prejudice pronunciation in English

Pronounce Prejudice in English

Prejudice

see synonyms of prejudice

Noun

1. bias, preconception, prejudice

a partiality that prevents objective consideration of an issue or situation

Verb

2. prejudice

disadvantage by prejudice

3. prejudice, prepossess

influence (somebody's) opinion in advance

WordNet Lexical Database for English. Princeton University. 2010.


Prejudice

see synonyms of prejudice
noun
1. 
an opinion formed beforehand, esp an unfavourable one based on inadequate facts
2. 
the act or condition of holding such opinions
3. 
intolerance of or dislike for people of a specific race, religion, etc
4. 
disadvantage or injury resulting from prejudice
5.  to the prejudice of
6.  without prejudice
verb (transitive)
7. 
to cause to be prejudiced
8. 
to disadvantage or injure by prejudice

Collins English Dictionary. Copyright © HarperCollins Publishers


Prejudice

see synonyms of prejudice
noun
1. 
a judgment or opinion formed before the facts are known; preconceived idea, favorable or, more usually, unfavorable
2. 
a. 
a judgment or opinion held in disregard of facts that contradict it; unreasonable bias
a prejudice against modern art
b. 
the holding of such judgments or opinions
3. 
suspicion, intolerance, or irrational hatred of other races, creeds, regions, occupations, etc.
4. 
injury or harm resulting as from some judgment or action of another or others
verb transitiveWord forms: ˈprejudiced or ˈprejudicing
5. 
to injure or harm, as by some judgment or action
6. 
to cause to have or show prejudice; bias

Webster’s New World College Dictionary, 4th Edition. Copyright © 2010 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved.


Prejudice

see synonyms of prejudice
n.
1.
a. The act or state of holding unreasonable preconceived judgments or convictions: “This is not actually a volume of the best short stories … These are just the stories that I like best, and I am full of prejudice and strong opinions” (Ann Patchett).
b. An adverse judgment or opinion formed unfairly or without knowledge of the facts: a boy with a prejudice against unfamiliar foods.
2. Irrational suspicion or hatred of a particular social group, such as a race or the adherents of a religion.
3.
a. Detriment or harm caused to a person, especially in a legal case: The delay operated to her prejudice.
b. Preclusionary effect, preventing further pursuit of one's interests: The case was dismissed with prejudice.
tr.v. prej·u·diced, prej·u·dic·ing, prej·u·dic·es
1. To fill with prejudice or cause to judge with prejudice: My rural upbringing has prejudiced me against living in the city. See Synonyms at bias.
2. To affect detrimentally or harmfully by a judgment or act: Negative media coverage prejudiced people's opinion of the mayor.

The American Heritage ® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2018 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.