Definition of Inform in English :

Define Inform in English

Inform meaning in English

Meaning of Inform in English

Pronunciation of Inform in English

Inform pronunciation in English

Pronounce Inform in English

Inform

see synonyms of inform

Verb

1. inform

impart knowledge of some fact, state or affairs, or event to

Example Sentences:
'I informed him of his rights'

2. inform

give character or essence to

Example Sentences:
'The principles that inform modern teaching'

3. inform

act as an informer

Example Sentences:
'She had informed on her own parents for years'

WordNet Lexical Database for English. Princeton University. 2010.


Inform

see synonyms of inform
verb
1. (tr; often foll by of or about)
to give information to; tell
2. (tr; often foll by of or about)
to make conversant (with)
3. (intr; often foll by against or on)
to give information regarding criminals, as to the police, etc
4. 
to give form to
5. 
to impart some essential or formative characteristic to
6. (transitive)
to animate or inspire
7. (transitive) obsolete
a. 
to train or educate
b. 
to report
adjective
archaic
without shape; unformed

Collins English Dictionary. Copyright © HarperCollins Publishers


Inform

see synonyms of inform
verb transitive
1. 
a.  Obsolete
to give form to
b. 
to give character to; be the formative principle of
c. 
to give or inspire with some specific quality or character
2.  Rare
to form or shape (the mind); teach; instruct
3. 
to give knowledge of something to; tell; acquaint with a fact, etc.
verb intransitive
4. 
to give information
5. 
to give information laying blame or accusation upon another
adjective
Archaic
without form; formless

Webster’s New World College Dictionary, 4th Edition. Copyright © 2010 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved.


Inform

see synonyms of inform
v. in·formed, in·form·ing, in·forms
v.tr.
1.
a. To impart information to; make aware of something: We were informed by mail of the change in plans. The nurse informed me that visiting hours were over.
b. To acquaint (oneself) with knowledge of a subject.
2.
a. To give form or character to; imbue with a quality or an essence: "A society's strength is measured by ... its ability to inform a future generation with its moral standards" (Vanity Fair).
b. To be a formative or characterizing presence in; animate: "It is this brash, backroom sensibility that informs his work as a novelist" (Jeff Shear).
3. Obsolete To form (the mind or character) by teaching or training.
v.intr.
1. To give or provide information.
2. To disclose confidential or incriminating information to an authority: The defendant informed against the other members of the ring.

The American Heritage ® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2018 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.